Purpose - showing care & support

Purpose - showing care & support Pixabay 284528

Putting time and effort into creating a special occasion, is one way we can show our care and support for others.

A celebration may be for people we know on a personal level or people on our local communities, or perhaps even for people we have not met before.

However this type of Party With A Purpose is usally for someone we know on a personal level and may be specifically designed to meet that person's specific needs, even if we use a birthday, anniversary, mothers, fathers, neighbours, valentines or some other special day as a reason to show our care and support. 

Paul 'Feisty' Hassing Founder & Senior Writer @ The Feisty Empire explains: "We drop everything to attend the funeral of someone we love. Whatever our commitments, we work around them, because there's only ever one official opportunity to mourn with others who knew the beloved. Getting time off work, postponing holidays, rescheduling meetings and so on can be difficult and inconvenient, but we do it. We go to great pains to 'celebrate' death; why not do the same to celebrate life?"

Paul has termed a gathering to celebrate friendships before they are dissolved by death, a liferal.

Paul describes such a gathering, his friends organised at a particulalry difficult time in his life. His 'liferal' was a turning point - as he describes "a heady experience indeed. Mine turned me round and made me focus on all I had, not what I didn't. Apart from my wedding, it was the best day of my life.

To read about Liferals: Home > Everyone > Celebrating every stage of life > Celebrating every stage of life > Liferals - Celebrate the living!

Ceremonies that involve people who are well known to each other are much more likey to have opportunities for hugs or what Gary Chapman describes as appropriate touch. ie for physical contact.

appropriate touch

In truth though, all ceremonies and celebrations have the potential to be an expression of our care and support ie to have all 5 love languages involved. Which is important as we may not be sure as to what is the primary or even secondary love language of the recipient of the ceremony. Using all 5 covers all bases :-)

Coming of Teen-Age or Adolescence (whatever is more appropriate - some children mature early) and Coming of Age (18th and/or 21st Birthdays) are times for showing how much our society cares about its young people. Adolsecence is a time of great change, of huge stress and challenges.

Families may engage a celebrant to work with them to design a personal ceremony to support their teenager through these transitions.

Starting planning now:

Use a birthday, wedding anniversary (two for the price of one :-), Mother's Day, Father's Day, Grandparent's Day, Neighour Day, Carers Week, etc.

 

five love languages

* As defined by Gary Chapman Author of the 5 Love Languages
 http://www.5lovelanguages.com/

 

Note: The The Celebrants Network Inc notes non-Australian born people receive a Citizenship Ceremony whereas Australian born do not. 

The TCN has proposed that a Coming of Full Citizenship Age ceremony be used as a community support rite of passage for all Australians turning 18 years.


The The Celebrants Network Inc notes non-Australian born people receive a Citizenship Ceremony whereas Australian born do not. 

The TCN has proposed that a Coming of Full Citizenship Age ceremony be used as a community support rite of passage for all Australians turning 18 years. 

The TCN welcomes feedback and community support for its proposal - email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

Last modified on Thursday, 05 September 2019 15:16